Explore the fascinating world of the Victorian judges at this award-winning historic house.

Sandwiches

Victoria Sandwiches

Cut thin brown bread and butter, and between two slices place alternate layers of thinly sliced hard boiled eggs, small salad or American cress, the cleansed fillets of anchovies; divide these slices into small squares or oblongs and serve them on a napkin, either for breakfast, luncheon or supper.
Francatelli, Chef to Queen Victoria

Ordinary Sandwiches

Between thin slices of bread and butter cut - either from half-quarten brown or French loaves or from rolls, place thin slices of beef, veal and ham, or bacon, mutton, poultry, or game; in any case, the meat should be seasoned with pepper and salt, and English or French mustard; sliced pickles are sometimes added. When the sandwiches have been pressed with the hand, to make all ingredients adhere together, cut them in squares, dish up on a napkin and serve.
Francatelli

Cheese Sandwich (quite new)

Take a small quantity of very fresh cream cheese, put it in a basin or a marble mortar, add some salt, pepper, and a little mustard, beat it well up until it is of the same consistency as butter; if too hard, add a little of the latter, and use it as butter on bread with slices of meat between.
Alexis Soyer

Cheese Sandwiches

Although not a picnic dish, we included this to show what a 'thin' slice of cheese apparently was!
Cut from a nice fat Cheshire, or any good rich cheese, some thin slices about 1/2 inch thick, and place them between some slices of brown bread and butter, like sandwiches. These may be placed on a plate in the oven and, when the bread is toasted, serve on a napkin very hot and very quickly.
Mrs Beeton

News

Strange But True

  • list arrowHow did Victorians try out a new invention?

    Test it on the servants of course! That's what happened in 1860 at The Judge's Lodging, when gas lighting was put into the basement and not the Judge's rooms. They wanted to see if they got sick from the fumes. The servants were fine - that's why we got the lights working again.

Historical Handy Hints

Recipes