Strange But True

Strange But True

  • Inexpressibles

    The name given to the tight trousers worn by some Regency gentlemen, such as the notorious Beau Brummell and his ‘dandy’ followers,  as they showed off their leg muscles.

  • What did Victoria do first

    after her coronation in 1837?  Have a parliamentary meeting?  Have tea with all the royal dignitaries?  No – she gave her dog, Dash, a bath.

     

  • Now that’s what we call a cake!

    Victoria and Albert’s wedding cake was a colossal 9 feet wide and weighed 300 pounds.

     

  • Victorian ladies’ knickers had no middle

    Once they got all those big dresses on, they couldn’t reach their knickers to pull them down, so they could stand over a potty to wee with these on instead.

     

  • Would you wee in your dining room?

    Victorian gentlemen did! Some dining rooms (like ours) had a special cupboard to house a chamber pot so all the gentlemen could go for a wee without leaving the table (once the ladies had left the room, of course!).

     

  • The last ducking stool to be used in England

    (in 1809) can still be seen not far from us in the Priory Church, Leominster, Herefordshire. It’s huge.

     

Handy Hints

Handy Hints

  • An insect trap

    Scoop out the inside of a turnip, scallop the edges, and place it downward in the earth. The insects will pass into it as a place of retreat through the holes, and the cucumbers, squashes, melons etc., may soon be clear of them.  1852

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • Anti-magnetic properties of the onion

    The magnetic power of a compass needle, will be entirely discharged or changed by being touched with the juice of an onion.

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • To clean gilt buckles, chains &c.

    Dip a soft brush in water, rub a little soap on it, and brush the article for a minute or two, then wash it clean, wipe it, and place it near the fire till dry, then brush it with burnt bread finely powdered. 1823

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • To remove grease from books

    Lay upon the spoon a little magnesium or powdered chalk, and under it the same; set on it a warm flat iron, and as soon as the grease is melted, it will be all absorbed, and leave the paper clean. 1852

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • Antidote against mice

    Gather wild mint, put it where you wish to keep them out, and they will not trouble you. 1852

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • Keeping your kettle clean

    To prevent teakettles coating with lime – put the shell of an oyster in the teakettle and the lime will adhere to it, instead of coating the sides. 1852

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

Savouries

Savouries

Potted Salmon

When you have any cold salmon left, take the skin off, and bone it, then put it in a marble mortar, with a good deal of clarified butter, season it pretty high with pepper, mace and malt, shred a little fennel very small, beat them all together exceeding fine, then put it close down into a pot, and cover it with clarified Butter.

Mrs Rafald

Judge’s Lodging Note – This is really quick and easy to make if you have a food processor. You can use cheap tinned salmon and it still tastes great. Should be served with trianges of cold dry toast but could go in sadnwiches. To carify butter, heat slowly until it starts to separate. The butter poured over the top will set to make a hard layer.

Ham Loaf

8 oz ham, 4 oz corned beef, 4 oz bread crumbs, lightly toasted, 1 cooking apple, grated, 2 oz sultanas, 2 eggs, beaten, 1tbsp chopped parsley, 1 tsp grated lemon rind, pinch allspice, pinch nutmeg, milk, salt and pepper.
Grease a loaf tin and coat inside with breadcrumbs. Mince the meat and mix with remaining breadcrumbs, fruit, herbs, spices and seasoning. Bind this together with the eggs, adding a little milk if needed. Spoon carefully into loaf tin and bake for 40 minutes. Allow to cool and turn out. Can also be eaten hot.
Modified from Mrs Beeton

Chicken and Ham Patties

Cold roast chicken. To every 1/4 lb of this, allow 2 oz of ham, 3 tablespoonfuls of cream, 2 tbsp of vegetable stock, 1/2 tsp of minced lemon peel; cayenne, salt, and pepper to taste; 1 tbsp of lemon juice, 1 oz of butter rolled in flour, vol-au vent cases.
Mince very small the white meat from a cold roast fowl, after removing all the skin; weigh it , and to every 1/4 lb. of meat allow the above proportion of minced ham. Put these into a stew-pan with the remaining ingredients, stir over the fire for ten minutes or _ hour, taking care that the mixture does not burn. Cook the vol-au-vents and when done, fill with the mixture.
Modified from Mrs Beeton

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