Strange But True

Strange But True

  • Inexpressibles

    The name given to the tight trousers worn by some Regency gentlemen, such as the notorious Beau Brummell and his ‘dandy’ followers,  as they showed off their leg muscles.

  • What did Victoria do first

    after her coronation in 1837?  Have a parliamentary meeting?  Have tea with all the royal dignitaries?  No – she gave her dog, Dash, a bath.

     

  • Now that’s what we call a cake!

    Victoria and Albert’s wedding cake was a colossal 9 feet wide and weighed 300 pounds.

     

  • Victorian ladies’ knickers had no middle

    Once they got all those big dresses on, they couldn’t reach their knickers to pull them down, so they could stand over a potty to wee with these on instead.

     

  • Would you wee in your dining room?

    Victorian gentlemen did! Some dining rooms (like ours) had a special cupboard to house a chamber pot so all the gentlemen could go for a wee without leaving the table (once the ladies had left the room, of course!).

     

  • The last ducking stool to be used in England

    (in 1809) can still be seen not far from us in the Priory Church, Leominster, Herefordshire. It’s huge.

     

Handy Hints

Handy Hints

  • An insect trap

    Scoop out the inside of a turnip, scallop the edges, and place it downward in the earth. The insects will pass into it as a place of retreat through the holes, and the cucumbers, squashes, melons etc., may soon be clear of them.  1852

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • Anti-magnetic properties of the onion

    The magnetic power of a compass needle, will be entirely discharged or changed by being touched with the juice of an onion.

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • To clean gilt buckles, chains &c.

    Dip a soft brush in water, rub a little soap on it, and brush the article for a minute or two, then wash it clean, wipe it, and place it near the fire till dry, then brush it with burnt bread finely powdered. 1823

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • To remove grease from books

    Lay upon the spoon a little magnesium or powdered chalk, and under it the same; set on it a warm flat iron, and as soon as the grease is melted, it will be all absorbed, and leave the paper clean. 1852

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • Antidote against mice

    Gather wild mint, put it where you wish to keep them out, and they will not trouble you. 1852

     

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

  • Keeping your kettle clean

    To prevent teakettles coating with lime – put the shell of an oyster in the teakettle and the lime will adhere to it, instead of coating the sides. 1852

    As with all our historical handy hints, this is a real tip from a Victorian book. We cannot say that it’ll work and it’s up to you if you want to try!

     

Thank you

Seriously, thank you.

We are always so touched and truly grateful for people who help us in any way. Since taking over ownership of our building at the end of 2018, so many people have supported us.  So, here, we simply want to say thank you to all those who have donated to our fundraising programme; those who have offered their time and skills; those who have talked through ideas with us and encouraged us.

The list of people below are by no means all of you – please excuse us if we have forgotten anyone – and there are some of you who wish to remain anonymous in your support, which is fine by us (just know that we appreciate you).  If you decide you do not want your name displayed here, just let us know.  We decided to go alphabetical, as we thank you all equally:

Constance Adams, The Addis Family, Suzanne Arbuthnott, John & Judy Arnold, Alan Bathurst, Cllr. Beverley Baynham, Robert & Jennifer Berry, Mr & Mrs Blazey,  Alvin Botting, Vera & Dez Bromage, Angie Bromfield, Rosie Burton, Sheenah & Barrie Campen, Mike Cole,  Ben & Louisa Collings, June Coveney, Janet Covey-Crump, Frank Davies, Ron Davies, Terry Davies,  Matt Davies, Holly Dodgson, Suzie Donnelly, Carol Driver, The Duke’s Arms Presteigne, Kristina Eddon, Roger Emmins, Federation of Museums and Art Galleries of Wales,  Colin & Teresa Felgate, Jonathan Felgate, Frances Field, Margaret Galliers, Alison Giles, Steph Glover, Richard Goddard, Anne Goodwin, Jake Griffiths, Llinos Griffiths, Trefor & Margaret Griffiths, Diane & Adam Gwilt, Keith Hatfield, Liz & Bill Higginson, Sue Hindle, Maggie James, Dave R.A.T.S. Jones, Evan Jones, Gareth Jones, John & Jenny Kendall, Colin Kirkby MBE, Sue Knox, Kay Lane, Sir Peter & Shelley Lane, Karen Latimer, Heather Lewis, Soo Linacre, Marlie Mace, Beth Northwood, Tracey McAdam, Anne & Terry McAlinden, Jan Miller, Gareth & Angela Morgan, Josh Partridge, Roger Pearce, Fiona & Alan Preece,  Presteigne & Norton Town Council, Celia Pyrdye, Alex & Helena Ramsay, Ruth Rayner, Avriel Reader, Malcolm & Pam Rivers, Barry Rivers, Jim Rogers, Julian Salmon, Rob & Barbara Shelton, Keith & Idris Slater, Dr Charlotte Smith, Tony & Mary Smith, Richard Studer, Mark Swann,  Edwin & Sue Taylor, Sue & Bob Thompson, John Trew, Heleen Van Der Meulen, Nigel & Sonia Williams, Joice Wilson

The work of The Judge’s Lodging is additionally gratefully supported by

 

Particular thanks go to Alex Ramsay and Dave R.A.T.S. Jones for allowing us to use their stunning photography on this site. Any pictures that are not totally amazing, are probably taken by staff here and these guys should not be held responsible!

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